Note the amber droplets on the underside. Not sure if its dew or came from the mushroom’s gills.  (at Union Theological Seminary)

Note the amber droplets on the underside. Not sure if its dew or came from the mushroom’s gills. (at Union Theological Seminary)

Cute little white mushroom. Maybe these are Hygrophorus leucophaeus instead. Very squat little things though.  (at Union Theological Seminary)

Cute little white mushroom. Maybe these are Hygrophorus leucophaeus instead. Very squat little things though. (at Union Theological Seminary)

Found a scattered group of these today. Possibly similar to hygrocybe nivea, snowy waxcap, but likely seething else. There were parts that seemed to be eaten or melted away and they had a rather sticky wet appearance.  (at Union Theological Seminary)

Found a scattered group of these today. Possibly similar to hygrocybe nivea, snowy waxcap, but likely seething else. There were parts that seemed to be eaten or melted away and they had a rather sticky wet appearance. (at Union Theological Seminary)

Underside of the same shaggy parasol, looks like someone pulled it out. Love the ring around the stem! (at El Porton)

Underside of the same shaggy parasol, looks like someone pulled it out. Love the ring around the stem! (at El Porton)

One of the little shaggy shrooms I kept seeing finally got to grow up so that i could see what it became. My best guess is Macrolepiota rhacodes, or shaggy parasol. This becomes most evident when pairing this specimen with some of the younger ones I found a few weeks ago. I hope a few more grow in this patch before winter.  (at Falafel on Broadway)

One of the little shaggy shrooms I kept seeing finally got to grow up so that i could see what it became. My best guess is Macrolepiota rhacodes, or shaggy parasol. This becomes most evident when pairing this specimen with some of the younger ones I found a few weeks ago. I hope a few more grow in this patch before winter. (at Falafel on Broadway)

Fantastically huge group of weeping oak brackets (Inonotus dryadeus). Creepy and glistening.  (at Bronx Zoo)

Fantastically huge group of weeping oak brackets (Inonotus dryadeus). Creepy and glistening. (at Bronx Zoo)

Saw these bright white beauties this morning next to some exploded fairy inky caps that were much larger. At first I assumed these were the same, but the lack of inkiness makes me think otherwise. Any ideas? These are about 1.5cm in diameter.  (at Falafel on Broadway)

Saw these bright white beauties this morning next to some exploded fairy inky caps that were much larger. At first I assumed these were the same, but the lack of inkiness makes me think otherwise. Any ideas? These are about 1.5cm in diameter. (at Falafel on Broadway)

Pretty little yellow things. Looked like flower petals in a little pile.  (at Andersen Hall Manhattan School of Music)

Pretty little yellow things. Looked like flower petals in a little pile. (at Andersen Hall Manhattan School of Music)

This is what the Cyathus stercoreus looks like after it matures and busts open. Those little black “eggs” are spore collections. Hence the name, “bird’s nest fungus”. When drops of rain land in the cup, the spores fly out and disperse.  (at Manhattan School of Music)

This is what the Cyathus stercoreus looks like after it matures and busts open. Those little black “eggs” are spore collections. Hence the name, “bird’s nest fungus”. When drops of rain land in the cup, the spores fly out and disperse. (at Manhattan School of Music)

Cyathus stercoreus, or Dung Loving Bird’s Nest Fungus, back again. These are fresh and haven’t yet busted open. See their furry, reticulated outer shell.  (at Manhattan School of Music)

Cyathus stercoreus, or Dung Loving Bird’s Nest Fungus, back again. These are fresh and haven’t yet busted open. See their furry, reticulated outer shell. (at Manhattan School of Music)